Yoga http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga.rss en Thu Jan 17 12:21:14 IST 2019 https://www.theweek.in/privacy-an-settlement.html getting-back-in-shape <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2020/03/06/getting-back-in-shape.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2020/3/6/42-Getting-back-in-shape-1.jpg" /> <p>The lower and upper back face a lot of stress from day-to-day activities. It is important to relax these body parts. Here is a simple technique to provide a soothing massage.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>Note:</b> Since the ball is inherently unstable, one must be careful.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD:</b></p> <p>• Take a stability ball of 30cm diametre</p> <p>• Sit in cross-legged position, with the back towards the wall</p> <p>• Keep the ball behind the back</p> <p>• Keep the ball between the lower back and the wall</p> <p>• Move as close to the wall as possible by pressing against the ball</p> <p>• The ball exerts a soothing pressure on the lumbar fascia (structure on the lower part of the back)</p> <p>• Breathe abdominally—inhale deep. Allow the abdominal cavity to expand; exhale as the abdominal cavity contracts</p> <p>• Stay for around five minutes with slow and steady breathing</p> <p>• Feel the expansion and contraction of the lumbar fascia as you inhale and exhale</p> <p>• Move the ball to the upper back. Tilt the head backward on to the ball, pushing the chest forward</p> <p>• Inhale deep, allowing the chest cavity to expand; exhale as the chest cavity contracts</p> <p>• Stay for three to five minutes with slow and steady breathing</p> <p>• Feel the expansion and contraction of the thoracic fascia (deep structure on the rear of the trunk) as you inhale and exhale</p> <p>• Relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2020/03/06/getting-back-in-shape.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2020/03/06/getting-back-in-shape.html Sat Mar 07 15:40:08 IST 2020 strengthen-the-neck <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2020/02/10/strengthen-the-neck.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2020/2/10/42-Strengthen-the-neck-1.jpg" /> <p>The neck is often subjected to strain, be it long hours of working, using mobiles and computers, travelling or poor postures. It is very important to keep the muscles of the neck strong and stable. Here is a technique to accomplish both.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>Note:</b> Since the ball is inherently unstable, one must be careful.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD:</b></p> <p>• Take a stability ball of 30cm diameter</p> <p>• Hold the ball and stand close to a wall, facing it</p> <p>• Place the ball between your forehead and the wall</p> <p>• Hold the ball with gentle pressure from the forehead and release your hands</p> <p>• Now press the ball with the forehead</p> <p>• Hold for 10 seconds</p> <p>• Ease the pressure for 10 seconds but keep the ball in place with gentle pressure</p> <p>• Repeat 10 times and relax</p> <p>• Repeat the procedure by pressing the ball with the back and both sides of the head</p> <p>• Relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2020/02/10/strengthen-the-neck.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2020/02/10/strengthen-the-neck.html Mon Feb 10 15:50:16 IST 2020 easing-the-pressure-points <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2020/01/24/easing-the-pressure-points.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2020/1/24/42-Easing-the-pressure-points-1.jpg" /> <p>The sitting and standing postures are very common. Naturally, the lower parts are put under pressure. And, the lower back is not spared either.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Here is a posture that relieves the stressed legs and the back. It also stimulates the thyroid glands.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>Note: </b>Since the ball is inherently unstable, be careful.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD:</b></p> <p>• Take a stability ball of 30cm diameter</p> <p>• Sit close to the wall with legs stretched</p> <p>• Keep the ball within reach</p> <p>• Turn around and stretch the legs up the wall</p> <p>• Rest the trunk on the floor</p> <p>• Hips should be close to the wall</p> <p>• With the heels against the wall, raise the hips</p> <p>• Roll the ball below the hips, and pull it closer to the trunk</p> <p>• Rest the back against the ball</p> <p>• Keeping the heels against the wall straighten both legs</p> <p>• Relax the arms</p> <p>• Stay for about four minutes with slow and steady breathing</p> <p>• Hold the ball, roll it out and slowly come down</p> <p>• Relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2020/01/24/easing-the-pressure-points.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2020/01/24/easing-the-pressure-points.html Fri Jan 24 16:17:03 IST 2020 that-magical-effect <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2020/01/10/that-magical-effect.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2020/1/10/42-That-magical-effect-1.jpg" /> <p>Flexibility and strength of the lower back are important for an active life. Here is a posture that helps achieve them. The posture also revives the organs in the abdomen and pelvis—they get a good massaging effect against the air-filled ball.</p> <p><br> This exercise also helps the gluteal muscles and thighs.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>Note:</b> Since the ball is inherently unstable, one must take care.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD:</b></p> <p>• Take a stability ball of 30cm diameter</p> <p>• Sit upright on your heels and keep the ball in front</p> <p>• Slowly bend, positioning the ball below the lower-belly</p> <p>• Rest the knees</p> <p>• Rest the head and elbows, keeping the wrists in line with the forehead</p> <p>• Raise legs slightly; rest the chest and chin on the mat</p> <p>• Press the palms and elbows, raise legs with lower-belly against the ball</p> <p>• Lift legs as much as possible</p> <p>• Stretch the feet and straighten legs</p> <p>• Stay for about 10-20 seconds</p> <p>• Do not hold your breath</p> <p>• Slowly flex the knees and rest legs</p> <p>• Gently get up</p> <p>• Repeat and relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2020/01/10/that-magical-effect.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2020/01/10/that-magical-effect.html Sat Jan 11 17:50:55 IST 2020 muscular-move <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/12/06/muscular-move.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/12/6/42-Muscular-move-1.jpg" /> <p>The lumbar, pelvic and hip complex is a trinity of muscular and skeletal health. The LPH complex musculature produces and reduces force, and stabilises the kinetic chain (ankle-knee-hip-trunk linkage) during functional movements. Hip movements with back bends provide good stimulation to the complex.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Note: Since the ball is inherently unstable, one must take care.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD</b></p> <p>• Take a stability ball of 30cm diameter</p> <p>• Squat on your feet and hold the ball behind you</p> <p>• Gently recline, resting the neck and shoulder complex on the ball</p> <p>• Gently roll the ball back; rest the head and shoulder on the floor</p> <p>• Keep legs folded and press the feet</p> <p>• Stretch both arms up</p> <p>• Stay with slow breathing for five seconds</p> <p>• Raise your right leg up, perpendicular to the floor</p> <p>• Stay with slow breathing for five seconds</p> <p>• Bring the right leg down; repeat with left leg</p> <p>• Bring the left leg down</p> <p>• Slowly stretch both legs forward</p> <p>• Pull the knee caps and stretch the heels</p> <p>• Stay with slow breathing for 10 seconds</p> <p>• Slowly come down</p> <p>• Repeat and relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/12/06/muscular-move.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/12/06/muscular-move.html Sat Dec 07 16:53:57 IST 2019 stretch-it-to-last <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/11/12/stretch-it-to-last.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/11/12/42-Stretch-it-to-last-1.jpg" /> <p>The pelvis houses the main organs of the reproductive system, while the abdomen has the main organs of the digestive system. Both need a good stretch to prevent stagnation and improve the blood flow. This posture imparts good flexibility to the spine.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD</b></p> <p>• Take a stability ball of approximately 30cm diameter</p> <p>• Take a cotton bolster</p> <p>• Sit upright, cross-legged, at the edge of the bolster</p> <p>• Keep the ball behind the back, on the bolster</p> <p>• Keep the feet by the side of the bolster and hold the ball in position</p> <p>• Slowly recline on the ball, resting the upper back</p> <p>• Raise the hips, and extend the neck as much you can</p> <p>• Roll the ball slightly and move the head towards the floor</p> <p>• Your folded arms and the head should be on the floor</p> <p>• If the head is not on the floor, keep a folded blanket below the head</p> <p>• The ball imparts a good stretch to pelvis, abdomen and chest</p> <p>• Stay for around four minutes with slow abdominal breathing</p> <p>• Take your arms up, roll over the ball to rest the hip on the bolster</p> <p>• Slowly get up and relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/11/12/stretch-it-to-last.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/11/12/stretch-it-to-last.html Tue Nov 12 15:55:29 IST 2019 quadra-push <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/11/01/quadra-push.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/11/1/42-Quadra-push-1.jpg" /> <p>The abdominal cavity can be roughly divided into four parts—right upper, left upper, right lower and left lower. The main organs on the right side are liver, gall bladder, head of pancreas, right kidney and appendix. The main organs on the left side are stomach, spleen, left lobe of liver, body of pancreas, left kidney, and a part of the colon.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Back bends and twisting postures stimulate the quadrants of the abdomen. Here is one such technique using a small stability ball.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD</b></p> <p>• Take a stability ball of size 30cm diameter</p> <p>• Sit upright with legs folded to the side</p> <p>• Keep the ball close to the back</p> <p>• With left hand hold the right knee and twist the trunk to the right</p> <p>• Move the ball to the right and align the ball to the trunk with the help of the right hand</p> <p>• Hold the ball close to the back, slowly recline the trunk against the ball</p> <p>• Stretch both hands straight over the head</p> <p>• Stay for about two minutes with slow abdominal breathing</p> <p>• Feel the right side of the abdomen</p> <p>• Slowly come up and sit upright</p> <p>• Change side and relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/11/01/quadra-push.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/11/01/quadra-push.html Sat Nov 02 17:28:19 IST 2019 relief-for-your-neck <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/10/04/relief-for-your-neck.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/10/4/42-Relief-for-your-neck-1.jpg" /> <p>The neck is a slender structure. The muscles around the neck can easily get tensed, because of long hours of sitting in front of a table. The usage of gadgets promotes head-forward position, leading to fatigue around the neck. Here is a simple technique to provide relief to the neck.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD</b></p> <p>• Take a stability ball of 30cm diameter</p> <p>• Sit upright on your heels</p> <p>• Keep the ball in front</p> <p>• Lie on your chest and hold the ball</p> <p>• Raise your neck and upper back with the support of your elbows</p> <p>• Roll the ball towards the neck</p> <p>• Extend the neck backwards, and position the ball against the chin and the throat</p> <p>• Slowly release the hands and stretch them sideways</p> <p>• Press the ball against the chin and extend the neck further</p> <p>• Stay for about 60 seconds with slow abdominal breathing</p> <p>• Take the arms up, hold the ball, roll it forward and relax the neck</p> <p>• Repeat</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/10/04/relief-for-your-neck.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/10/04/relief-for-your-neck.html Sat Oct 05 16:59:46 IST 2019 the-side-stretch <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/09/10/the-side-stretch.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/9/10/42-The-side-stretch-1.jpg" /> <p>Our trunk can bend in all directions. Bending sideways is good for abdominal organs—liver, spleen, stomach, pancreas, small and large intestines. It is important to provide compression and extension to these organs, so that they are stimulated. Here is a simple technique to accomplish this using a stability ball. It also helps the back muscles and the shoulder complex.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD</b></p> <p>• Take a stability ball of size 30cm diameter</p> <p>• Sit upright with legs crossed</p> <p>• Keep the ball by your right side, and in line with the hip</p> <p>• Hold the ball and position it close to the trunk</p> <p>• Rest the right palm on the floor</p> <p>• Slowly bend the trunk to the right side</p> <p>• Rest your trunk on the ball and stretch the left hand</p> <p>• Bring the left upper arm closer to the ear</p> <p>• Ensure the left knee is not lifted</p> <p>• Pull the left hand to induce stretch of the left lateral trunk</p> <p>• Ball imparts good pressure on the right side of the abdomen and stretch on the left side</p> <p>• Stay for about two minutes with slow abdominal breathing</p> <p>• Slowly come up, bring the left hand down</p> <p>• Change side and relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/09/10/the-side-stretch.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/09/10/the-side-stretch.html Sat Sep 14 16:36:19 IST 2019 stretch-the-trunk <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/08/20/stretch-the-trunk.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/8/20/42-Stretch-the-trunk-1.jpg" /> <p>The trunk houses a host of organs like the urogenital in the pelvis, liver, spleen, gall bladder, pancreas, small and large intestine in the abdomen, and heart and lungs in the chest. It is important to stretch the trunk so that these organs get an invigorating movement. Here is a simple technique to accomplish this. The posture also helps the thigh and legs, while enhancing the quality of stretch.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Note: Since the ball is inherently unstable, be careful.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD</b></p> <p>• Take a stability ball of 30cm diameter</p> <p>• Sit upright with legs crossed</p> <p>• Take both legs forward</p> <p>• Fold the right leg and then the left leg to assume Veerasana (a kneeling asana in modern yoga)</p> <p>• Keep the stability ball behind</p> <p>• Hold the ball with both hands and pull it close to the back</p> <p>• Slowly bend backward on the ball</p> <p>• Extend the neck and rest the trunk on the ball</p> <p>• Slowly stretch both arms up and keep them straight</p> <p>• Stay for about three to five minutes with slow and steady breathing</p> <p>• Take the arms up, press the palms and slowly get up</p> <p>• Relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/08/20/stretch-the-trunk.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/08/20/stretch-the-trunk.html Sat Aug 24 15:32:20 IST 2019 strengthen-the-back <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/07/20/strengthen-the-back.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/7/20/42-Strengthen-the-back-1.jpg" /> <p>The lower back is the most stressed part of our body, and can become painful and stiff. Here is a simple technique to help the lower back with flexibility and strength. The posture invigorates the abdominal organs.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Note: Since the ball is inherently unstable, care is advised.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD:</b></p> <p>• Take a stability ball of 30 cm diameter</p> <p>• Sit upright on your heels and keep the ball in front</p> <p>• Slowly bend down positioning the ball below the belly</p> <p>• Rest the knees and palms; keep palm in front of your head</p> <p>• Press the palms, raise the trunk up with belly against the ball</p> <p>• Stretch the feet and straighten the legs</p> <p>• Stay for about 10 seconds</p> <p>• Rest the knees down and raise both hands up</p> <p>• Hold the position for about 10 seconds</p> <p>• Do not hold the breath</p> <p>• Slowly come down</p> <p>• Repeat the above movements three times</p> <p>• Relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/07/20/strengthen-the-back.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/07/20/strengthen-the-back.html Sat Jul 20 18:01:31 IST 2019 magic-bend <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/06/25/magic-bend.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/6/25/42-Magic-bend-1.jpg" /> <p>Sideward bending of the trunk plays a significant role in the health of the spine. It also helps the abdominal organs, in particular the liver, spleen and pancreas. This movement helps ribs, intercostal muscles and the muscles of the chest. When you do this, the shoulders develop better flexibility and strength. Here is a safe way of inducing this stretch to the trunk using a stability ball.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD:</b></p> <p>• Take a stability ball of 30cm diameter</p> <p>• Sit upright with legs crossed</p> <p>• Keep the ball on your right side</p> <p>• Keep the ball as close to the trunk as possible</p> <p>• Rest your right hand on the ball</p> <p>• Taking the right hand down, press the palm and pull the ball against the trunk</p> <p>• Resting the trunk on the ball, slowly bend to the right side</p> <p>• Ensure there is no gap between the ball and the trunk</p> <p>• Stretch your left hand straight, in line with the trunk</p> <p>• Pull the trunk from the left hand and do not raise the left knee</p> <p>• Stay for about 30 seconds with slow abdominal breathing</p> <p>• Slowly come back to the original position</p> <p>• Change side</p> <p>• Repeat and relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/06/25/magic-bend.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/06/25/magic-bend.html Tue Jun 25 18:32:07 IST 2019 the-spine-fine <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/06/15/the-spine-fine.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/6/15/42-The-spines-fine-1.jpg" /> <p>The three segments of the spine—cervical, thoracic and lumbar—have to be kept well. They are subjected to quite an amount of loading and need some degree of maintenance. Here is a simple massaging technique to relax these segments. It also strengthens the abdominal muscles.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Note: Since the ball is inherently unstable, initially, it is suggested to be careful.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD</b></p> <p>• Take a stability ball of 30cm diameter</p> <p>• Squat on your feet and hold the ball behind, at a distance of about a foot</p> <p>• Gently recline back resting the neck and shoulder complex on the ball</p> <p>• Take the arms to the front and rest the palms</p> <p>• Raise the hips up</p> <p>• Stretch the neck back on the ball and rest the upper back on the ball</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>Now do the following actions simultaneously:</b></p> <p>• Press the feet and gently straighten the leg a bit</p> <p>• Curl the neck and upper back upwards</p> <p>• Press the lower back against the ball</p> <p>• Stay for about 20 seconds with slow breathing</p> <p>• Flex the knee and slowly descend</p> <p>• Repeat the above movements three times</p> <p>• Relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/06/15/the-spine-fine.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/06/15/the-spine-fine.html Sat Jun 15 19:58:53 IST 2019 soothe-your-pain <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/05/22/soothe-your-pain.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/5/22/42-Soothe-your-pain-1.jpg" /> <p>Working for long hours on computers, laptops, tablets and mobile phones leads to rounded shoulders and hunched back. It results in tightening of muscles around the shoulder and neck. It also compresses the brachial plexus (group of nerves that come from the spinal cord in the neck and travel down the arm), which may cause pain around the chest.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This can be relieved by uncoiling the hunched back. Here is a simple technique to accomplish this using a stability ball.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD</b></p> <p>• Take a stability ball of 30cm diameter</p> <p>• Sit upright with legs crossed</p> <p>• Keep the ball at the back</p> <p>• Hold the ball and position it a little away from the back</p> <p>• Slowly recline on the ball, resting the upper back</p> <p>• Extend the neck as much as possible</p> <p>• Stretch both arms up, parallel to the floor</p> <p>• Ball imparts good stretch to pelvis, abdominal muscles and chest</p> <p>• Stay for about two to four minutes with slow abdominal breathing</p> <p>• Take the arms up, press the palms on the floor and slowly get up</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/05/22/soothe-your-pain.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/05/22/soothe-your-pain.html Wed May 22 13:07:30 IST 2019 invert-and-invigorate <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/05/03/invert-and-invigorate.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/5/3/42-Invert-and-invigorate-1.jpg" /> <p>In general, the lower extremities are under greater stress due to gravity. The organs in the abdomen experience a settled-down condition due to gravity. It is important to provide relief to these stressed regions. This is possible through inverted postures. Here is such a simple posture which can be done using a brick. The posture helps the thyroid glands by invigorating the complete system.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD</b></p> <p>1. Take a brick made out of high density foam and measuring approximately 8x4x4 inches</p> <p>2. Sit upright on a mat and keep the brick by the side</p> <p>3. Lie on your back</p> <p>4. Fold both legs and bring the heels closer to the hips</p> <p>5. Press the feet and gently raise the hips up</p> <p>6. Place the brick directly below the sacrum (the flat bone at the back—the articulation between the hip and spinal column)</p> <p>7. Ensure the chest does not sink</p> <p>8. Raise the chest and take the chin to the chest</p> <p>9. Slowly raise both legs up</p> <p>10. Pull the kneecaps and keep the legs straight</p> <p>11. Make sure to keep the legs perpendicular to the floor</p> <p>12. Stay for about five minutes with slow breathing</p> <p>13. Fold both legs, keep the feet on the floor and take out the brick</p> <p>14. Relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/05/03/invert-and-invigorate.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/05/03/invert-and-invigorate.html Sat May 04 14:29:04 IST 2019 complete-reliever <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/04/18/complete-reliever.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/4/18/42-Complete-reliever-1.jpg" /> <p>Bending backwards, with support at the sacrum (flat bones of the spinal column), has several benefits. It eases the lower back, rejuvenates the pelvic muscles and organs, gives a good stretch to the chest and abdomen, and relieves the strain around the neck. Here is a technique to accomplish this.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD</b></p> <p>1) Take a brick made of high density foam and measuring approximately 8 inch x 4 inch x 4 inch</p> <p>2) Sit upright with legs crossed</p> <p>3) Lie on your back and fold the legs, taking heels closer to the hips</p> <p>4) Press the feet and raise the hips</p> <p>5) Pin the shoulders down and take the chest towards the chin</p> <p>6) Take the brick and position vertically below the sacrum</p> <p>7) Ensure the brick does not poke the lower back</p> <p>8) Slowly slide the heels forward and stretch both legs</p> <p>9) Pull the knee caps and keep the legs straight</p> <p>10) Straighten and stretch both arms without lifting them from the floor</p> <p>11) Stay for about four minutes with slow abdominal breathing</p> <p>12) Fold the legs and descend</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/04/18/complete-reliever.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/04/18/complete-reliever.html Sat Apr 20 15:52:25 IST 2019 get-a-leg-up <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/03/29/get-a-leg-up.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/3/29/42-Get-a-leg-up-1.jpg" /> <p>The feet, legs and thighs play a vital role for standing and walking. The ankle, knee and hip joints, and the surrounding muscles come under great stress. It is essential to relax the lower extremities so that they remain healthy. For this, a unique posture called Virasana is advised. However, this posture could be difficult for many owing to stiffness. So here is a simple technique by which the three lower extremity joints are rejuvenated. It also reduces fatigue in the calf muscles.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD:</b></p> <p>1. Take two bricks made out of high density foam and measuring approximately 8x4x4 inches</p> <p>2. Sit upright on a mat and keep the bricks behind you</p> <p>3. Keep the bricks one on top of the other</p> <p>4. Kneel and spread the feet</p> <p>5. Position the bricks below the hips</p> <p>6. Gently flex the knees and rest the hips on the bricks</p> <p>7. Keep the knees closer</p> <p>8. Stay for around three minutes with slow breathing</p> <p>9. Slowly get up and stretch both legs forward</p> <p>10. Sit cross-legged and relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/03/29/get-a-leg-up.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/03/29/get-a-leg-up.html Sat Mar 30 17:19:25 IST 2019 the-nerve-relaxant <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/03/08/the-nerve-relaxant.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/3/8/42-The-nerve-relaxant-1.jpg" /> <p>The vagus nerve is a very long nerve that originates in the&nbsp;brain stem&nbsp;and extends down through the neck and into the chest and abdomen. The vagus nerve helps control several muscles of the throat and the voice box. It has profound influence in regulating the heart rate and keeping the gastrointestinal tract in order. It is very important to properly stimulate this nerve so that relaxation sets in.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Forward bends, if done properly, provide a healthy stimulation to the vagus nerve. Here is one such posture.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD:</b></p> <p>1. Take a brick made of high density foam and measuring approximately 8x4x4 inches</p> <p>2. Keep the brick (in horizontal position) on the mat</p> <p>3. Sit upright on the brick—hips on the brick and feet on the mat</p> <p>4. Keep one more brick (in vertical position) in front</p> <p>5. Stretching the spine slowly, bend forward</p> <p>6. Hold and move the brick so as to comfortably rest the forehead on the brick</p> <p>7. Stretch the abdominal region</p> <p>8. Stretch both arms forward and rest them on the mat</p> <p>9. Stay for about two to five minutes with slow breathing—as you inhale the abdominal cavity should expand and as you exhale it should contract</p> <p>10. Flex the arms, press the palms and slowly get up</p> <p>11. Relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/03/08/the-nerve-relaxant.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/03/08/the-nerve-relaxant.html Sat Mar 09 17:02:00 IST 2019 pelvis-stretch <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/02/16/pelvis-stretch.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/2/16/42-Pelvis-stretch-1.jpg" /> <p>The health of urogenital organs is very important. They need to be provided a good stretch, aided with good breathing, so that they remain healthy. This is possible by providing three-dimensional stretch to the pelvic cavity. Here is such a technique using a brick. This posture is especially recommended for women.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD:</b></p> <p>1. Take a brick made out of high density foam and measuring approximately 8 inch x 4 inch x 4 inch</p> <p>2. Sit upright on a mat with legs crossed</p> <p>3. Lie on your back with legs folded; take the heels closer to the hips</p> <p>4. Keep the brick length-wise by your side</p> <p>5. Raise the hips up and position the brick just below the sacrum (the flat bony surface of the spinal column)</p> <p>6. The brick should not press against the lower back</p> <p>7. Join the feet and gently move the knees towards the ground</p> <p>8. Gently raise the chest up and relax the arms by the side</p> <p>9. Feel the length-wise and breadth-wise stretch, and propping up of the pelvic cavity</p> <p>10. Stay for about 3 to 5 minutes with slow abdominal breathing</p> <p>11. Bring the knees up; take out the brick and relax</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/02/16/pelvis-stretch.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/02/16/pelvis-stretch.html Sat Feb 16 18:03:20 IST 2019 stretch-the-upper-back <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/01/25/stretch-the-upper-back.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/1/25/42-Stretch-the-upper-back-1.jpg" /> <p>The thoracic spine, referred to as upper back, is not as flexible as the lower back. Here is a simple technique using a brick to bend the upper back. This not only helps the flexibility of the upper back but also gives a good stretch to the muscles of the chest and ribs. The centre of the chest, recognised as the emotion centre, gets good stimulation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD</b></p> <p>1. Take a brick made out of high density foam and measuring approximately<br> 8 x 4 x 4 inches</p> <p>2. Sit upright on a mat and keep the brick behind you</p> <p>3. The brick should be in line with the spinal column and about one feet away</p> <p>4. Beginners may keep the brick horizontally; persons with better flexibility can keep the brick vertically</p> <p>5. Take the arms back, press the palms and stretch both legs forward</p> <p>6. Slowly recline, resting the elbows</p> <p>7. The portion of the upper back, just behind the sternum, should rest on the brick</p> <p>8. Extend the chest and neck so as to rest the head on the mat</p> <p>9. Slowly stretch both arms up</p> <p>10. Stay for about three minutes with slow breathing</p> <p>11. Take the arms up, press the elbows and get up</p> <p>12. Relax and repeat</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/01/25/stretch-the-upper-back.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/01/25/stretch-the-upper-back.html Fri Jan 25 19:18:28 IST 2019 profound-influence <a href="http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/01/11/profound-influence.html"><img border="0" hspace="10" align="left" style="margin-top:3px;margin-right:5px;" src="http://img.theweek.in/content/dam/week/magazine/health/yoga/images/2019/1/11/42-Profound-influence-1.jpg" /> <p>The thyroid gland is located in the neck between the C5 and T1 vertebrae, and overlies the second, third and fourth cartilage rings supporting the windpipe. The thyroid hormones have profound influence on one’s overall health.</p> <p>The gland has a rich blood supply and the hormones produced here have access to the bloodstream. Here are two postures that help the thyroid gland.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD I</b></p> <p>1. Keep two bolsters in T-shape on a mat</p> <p>2. Keep a chair behind the bolster; keep a blanket on the chair</p> <p>3. Sit upright in cross-legged position at the edge of the bolster</p> <p>4. Slowly recline and rest the shoulder on the bolster with head down on the mat</p> <p>5. Keep the arms by the side</p> <p>6. Slowly raise the trunk up and rest the legs on the chair</p> <p>7. Ensure the shoulder remains on the bolster and neck is not too compressed</p> <p>8. Keep the trunk straight and relax the arms</p> <p>9. Breathe abdominally and stay for around five minutes</p> <p>10. Press the palms and slowly descend</p> <p>11. Relax for a minute and then get up</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><b>METHOD II</b></p> <p>1. Sit upright on a bolster in cross-legged position</p> <p>2. Keep a chair and a blanket in front</p> <p>3. Gently bend forward and rest the forehead on the chair</p> <p>4. Adjust the distance, so as to stretch the spine properly</p> <p>5. Breathe abdominally and stay for around five minutes</p> <p>6. Slowly get up</p> http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/01/11/profound-influence.html http://www.theweek.in/health/yoga/2019/01/11/profound-influence.html Sat Jan 12 17:19:52 IST 2019