'The Revenant' triumphs at Bafta awards

BRITAIN-ENTERTAINMENT-FILM-AWARDS-BAFTA US actor Leonardo DiCaprio (R) poses with the award for a leading actor and Mexican director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu (L) with his award for a director both for the film 'The Revenant' which won the award for best film at the BAFTA British Academy Film Awards at the Royal Opera House in London on Sunday | AFP

Leonardo DiCaprio's performance as a revenge-seeking fur trapper in "The Revenant" won him best actor at Bafta where the film dominated by bagging the best picture and director trophies.

Indo-British director Asif Kapadia's critically acclaimed documentary "Amy" on the late British songstress Amy Winehouse won the best documentary award at the British awards ceremony, hosted by Stephen Fry.

DiCaprio, who is the front-runner to win the best actor trophy at Oscars this year for his physically-gruelling performance in the Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's film, was previously nominated for "The Aviator", "The Departed" and most recently "The Wolf of Wall Street".

"The Revenant", based on the true-story of a 19th century fur trapper, who survived despite being mauled by a bear and abandoned for dead by his friends, won five major awards at the ceremony, while "Carol" had to return empty handed despite maximum nominations.

In his acceptance speech, DiCaprio paid tribute to British actors like Gary Oldman, Peter O'Toole and Daniel Day Lewis for influencing him as a performer. He also thanked his mother for helping him.

Inarritu, who swept the Oscars last year with "The Birdman" and a favourite this year as well, said the film's success at the Bafta awards was overwhelming.

Brie Larson won the best actress Bafta for her poignant portrayal of a woman kidnapped and kept in a small room with her child in "Room". Her trophy was accepted by the film's director.

George Miller's apocalyptic action movie "Mad Max: Fury Road" won four Baftas for hair and make up, editing, costume design and production design.

Both supporting acting prizes went to British winners.

DiCaprio's "Titanic" co-star Kate Winslet won her third Bafta trophy for her role as an Apple marketing executive Joanna Hoffman in "Steve Jobs". Her previous wins were for "Sense and Sensibility"and "The Reader".

Mark Rylance won in the best supporting actor category for his role of a Russian spy in Steven Spielberg's "Bridge of Spies".

Journalism drama "Spotlight" won one in the best original screenplay category, and co-writer and director Tom McCarthy dedicated the award to the reporters of the Boston Globe, who broke the story of the Catholic Church paedophile priest cover-up.

"The Big Short" won the best adapted screenplay award. Nick Hornby's "Brooklyn" was adjudged the outstanding British film.

Emmanuel Lubezki's win for cinematography for his work on "The Revenant" was his fourth Bafta. The Mexican has won for the past three years, having previously picked up statuettes for "Birdman" and "Gravity".

Best animation went to Disney/Pixar toon "Inside Out" and helmer Pete Docter accepted the award and called on young people in secondary school who were struggling and trying to figure things out to "express themselves."

Outstanding debut by a British writer, director or producer went to Jordanian pic "Theeb," directed by Naji Abu Nowar, beating out the more well-known "Ex Machina," helmed by Alex Garland. "Theeb" is up for an Oscar for best foreign language film.

"Star Wars: The Force Awakens" snapped up best special visual effects for Chris Corbould, Roger Guyett, Paul Kavanagh and Neal Scanlan.

The EE Rising star Bafta award, the only award voted for by the public, went to "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" and "Attack the Block" British star John Boyega.

"The Revenant" also won for best sound, while the original music trophy went to Ennio Morricone for "The Hateful Eight".

The best British short film honour went to "Operator," a movie funded by Kickstarter and helmed by Caroline Bartleet while best short animation went to "Edmond."

The obituary section included tributes to Alan Rickman, Maureen O'Hara, Omar Sharif, David Bowie, Ron Moody, Frank Finlay, Saeed Jaffrey and Christopher Lee.

Sidney Poitier, the first African-American to receive a best actor Oscar for his role in 1963 movie "Lilies of the Field", was honoured with a Bafta Fellowship, the highest accolade, for his outstanding and exceptional contribution to the business. He was unable to attend the ceremony in person due to health reasons.

Angels Costumes, the world's longest-established costume house, now in its 175th year, received the outstanding British contribution to cinema award.

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