PINK

A mirror to patriarchal society

  • A still from Pink
  • A still from Pink
  • A still from Pink

After a light-hearted Piku, Amitabh Bachchan and Shoojit Sircar have teamed up to hold up a mirror to the society. Pink is as real as the horror of being part of a system that is highly gender biased, opinionated, judgmental and, to top it all, hand in glove with the influential.

After a light-hearted Piku, Amitabh Bachchan and Shoojit Sircar have teamed up to hold up a mirror to the society. Pink is as real as the horror of being part of a system that is highly gender biased, opinionated, judgmental and, to top it all, hand in glove with the influential. A world where might is right; where one's social standing can tweak the truth to turn a victim into an offender and vice versa. And if one of the parties is a woman, dynamics change to include morality stemming from the societal definition of a 'good woman'.

Directed by Aniruddha Roy Chowdhury, Pink is the story of three educated, independent, working girls—Meenal Arora (Taapsee Pannu), Falak Ali (Kriti Kulhari) and Andrea (Andrea Tariang)—who find themselves in a deeply traumatic legal case, involving four patriarchal boys with high sense of entitlement. The first half of the film focuses on them and how each one fights her own battle against tension, fear, frustration and anger after the shocking incident. Interestingly, what draws equal attention, if not more, than the crux of the story, is the attitude of other men towards these women. There are men of all types–loving, caring and supportive friends and landlord to a nosy neighbour who is convinced about the trio's misconduct because he has seen male friends visiting them at home, from the highly judgmental cop who dissuades Meenal for filing an official complaint against the boys, to a common friend who tells Falak that whatever be the outcome of such an issue, it is women who lose respect in society. And an insensitive lawyer who is willing to tarnish their image and stamp them characterless to win the case for his clients. The film in no way is an attempt to show women as the helpless lot or men as the wrongdoers, but does show the society as it is.

In one of the best screenplays in 2016, screenwriter Ritesh Shah wastes no time in setting the scene and putting forth the case–rights of a woman vs feudal expectations of society. In this taut film, the protagonists like to dress up, attend parties, go for rock concerts and do not mind a few drinks with friends and acquaintances. But does it make them objects of desire for men? The film offers no new arguments for the cause of freedom of women from the clutches of a highly patriarchal society, but it speaks for them nevertheless.

Amitabh Bachchan plays the fierce lawyer Deepak Sehgal, who called it quits after being diagnosed with bipolar disorder, but makes a comeback to represent Meenal, Falak and Andrea, who are falsely accused of attempt to murder and prostitution. Bachchan's portrayal of an unwell lawyer who finds it difficult to concentrate the court's proceedings, yet wants to do his best to save the girls, seems effortless. Bachchan is in his elements as Sehgal. Piyush Mishra as the prosecution lawyer delivers a strong performance. But what takes the film a notch higher are excellent performances by Taapsee and Kirti.

Film: Pink
Director: Aniruddha Roy Chowdhury
Cast: Amitabh Bachchan, Taapsee Pannu, Kirti Kulhari, Angad Bedi, Piyush Mishra, Dhritiman Chatterjee, Andrea Taring
Rating: 4.5/5

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